January 26, 2020
  • 8:41 am Year of the Rat? What’s That?
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
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Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Iracema Navarro, Staff Writer 

CSUDH student Mouine Jackson-Taylor thinks that every person living in this country is equally important and that we all count.

Just as important, she thinks we should all be counted.

The senior public relations and advertising manager is also a recruiting manager for the U.S. Census Bureau, which next year will conduct the Decennial Census, the 10-year process mandated by the U.S. Constitution that collects the age, sex, ethnicity, and other data from every person living in every household in the country.

At least that that’s the goal, because the census numbers determine what states, cities and even neighborhoods receive federal funds, as well as how many seats each state receives in the U.S. House of Representatives.

As a student who found the job by seeing a brochure on campus, Jackson-Taylor wants other students to know that if they are looking for a temporary,  part-time job, working for the census is a good option, as its perks include “being close to home, great pay, paid training and flexible hours,” she said.

In fact, the bureau is looking for even more workers this cycle due to the  Trump Administration’s attempt to place a citizenship question on the census questionnaire. That attempt failed Aug 1 when a U.S. District Court judge signed a court order to permanently block the citizenship question due to its violating federal law.

However, confusion over the issue, such as undocumented people thinking they have to reveal their status on a government form, has caused concern at the bureau that response rates will be lower. But that also means it is even more determined to get accurate figures and is in the midst of a hiring push. That need, plus a very inclusive hiring policy makes working ideal for students looking for a part-time job, Jackson-Taylor said.

“We want people to go out into the community and we are hiring from the community,” she said. “There is no drug test, no resume required for it is a temporary position, and it is felon friendly expect those with a sex crime.”

Since being hired a year ago Jackson-Taylor has learned how important the census is on so many levels, something she actively tries to share with fellow students. She has also learned a valuable lesson of life through her position that she imparts to her three children, ages 23, 13 and 10.

“We have to count the small things because if we don’t look at the small things we will forget because there are so many things going on that seem destructive,” Jackson-Taylor said. 

And what do her children think? Well, Jackson-Taylor said one of the proudest moments of her life was when her 10-year-old daughter dressed up for Halloween wearing a similar outfit as her mother.

To apply to work for the U.S. Census, visit the 2020 Census website or contact Mouine at Mouine.Jackson-Taylor@2020census.gov. Interpreters are needed for various languages and applicants can apply with a green card. After completing the job, workers may use their government number to apply for a government job after the U.S. Census.

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