December 10, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:49 am CSUDH Celebrates First – Generation Students
  • 5:45 pm The Lightning Rod: 53-yard FG sinks Chargers
  • 8:16 am Gives Us Our Sunshine Back
  • 7:30 am University Theatre Re-Opens With Renovations
  • 4:20 pm Notes from the BULLpen: The Most Active Unit You’ll Ever Take
Story tips, concerns, questions?

“58/365 – Enjoying daylight savings” by B.Positive.2014 is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

By Violeta Rocha
Staff Reporter

Give us our sunshine back! With daylight saving time–NOT daylight savings time–it might be so easy at first to have that extra hour of sleep, but then the first day seems eternal, the anxiety kicks in, and you are just waiting for the day to be over. In March, when we spring it forward, we lose an hour of sleep and wake up sleep-deprived. Spring forward and fall back, well, we sure do know this routine with our eyes closed.

Arizona, Alaska, and Hawaii are the only states that don’t observe daylight saving time. So why are we still observing daylight saving time when other states have chosen to end it? 

Last year, 60 percent of California voters approved Proposition 7 to end Daylight Saving Time. So, why didn’t it go into effect at the beginning of the year? Well, you can blame it on Congress.

In order for the bill to move forward, it would require two-thirds of both the Senate and Assembly to end daylight saving time for good. Congress has failed to make daylight savings permanent.

According to an article by ABC, Democratic Rep. Kansen Chu of San Jose said he approved to get rid of having to change the clocks twice a year.

Chu has been an advocate to end daylight-saving time because it has increased car accidents and heart attacks when we spring forward and lose an hour of sleep. Is daylight saving the reason why our health has deteriorated?

According to an article in the Washington Post, Dr. Phyllis Zee, a sleep researcher at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago said, “Time changes mess with sleep schedules, a potential problem when so many people are already sleep-deprived.”

 So, where did this daylight savings idea even come from?

Should we blame Benjamin Franklin for proposing daylight saving time in 1784, which he wrote in his satirical essay, journal de Paris, that it was meant to save candle wax? Then, it was enacted in the United States during World War as a way to conserve fuel. In 1966, it was implemented where twice a year, we change it to standard time for six months and DTS for another six months. This established a system of the ordinance within each time zone.

So, will we ever get our sunshine back? It looks like we might get it back since there are currently four bills ready to be taken in action, and Congress has until Dec. 2020 to push forward with the laws.

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