November 14, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:25 pm Toros Booted Out of Playoffs in Dramatic Fashion
  • 8:43 am Saving One Tooth at a Time
  • 12:41 pm Women’s Soccer Back in Conference Playoffs
  • 9:40 am Will Gina Rodriguez Ever Shut the Hell Up?
  • 10:11 am How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love (well, tolerate anyway) the Bus
Story tips, concerns, questions?
The group that joined me in making the trip to Houston for the Galaxy match.

By Jeremy Gonzalez, Sports Editor

    Living in California means we get arguably the best weather in the country. Bright sunshine, clear skies, and a light breeze almost every day guaranteeing that any sporting event will be a delight to watch. It’s something we Angelinos take for granted.

    So how the hell did I find myself last weekend watching a soccer match 1,500 miles away, drenched in sweat while standing with strangers with the sun blazing down as humidity filled the air? Well those strangers and I shared a bond: we all chose to make the trip to watch our favorite soccer team, the Los Angeles Galaxy, take on a Western Conference rival, the Houston Dynamo, in each team’s final regular season game.

    We knew that traveling halfway across the country wouldn’t be easy and that our blue, white and gold would be overshadowed by the thousands of Dynamo fans wearing orange, but we still decided to make the trip and cheer on our boys as they fought to secure a home playoff game in the upcoming MLS postseason. 

    Being the away fans at a game meant we were the bad guys. We’re cheering for the villains who came to spoil the home team’s party. We got dirty looks and profanity shouted in our direction by people of all ages. Many people shouted banter at us about our team and we got obscene gestures involving a certain finger from many opposing fans. 

    As we made the quarter-mile march in overwhelming humidity from a local bar to the stadium, we were met with boos at every corner. But there were about 200 of us who flew to Houston, and we were ready: our chants in response growing louder with each group of Dynamo fans we passed. 

“We love ya, we love ya, we love ya, and everywhere we’ll follow, we’ll follow, we’ll follow, ‘cause we support LA, LA, LA, and that’s the way we like it, we like it, we like it, woah woah woah!” 

 For once, I understood the feeling of wearing the black hat at a sporting event. And I loved every minute of it, even if I didn’t feel comfortable walking along to the concession stand or restroom. It was a feeling I was unfamiliar with, but I welcomed the persona of being the villain in a sports match. 

    The final matchup in the MLS is known as Decision Day. It’s when playoff positions are solidified and you get to see who makes it to the big dance and who gets an early vacation. All 12 games involving all 24 MLS teams began at the same time, so we had to keep one eye on the general scoreboard to see what was going on in the other matches, while the other eye was on the match unfolding right before us.

This Decision Day matchup had huge implications for the MLS playoff seeding. The Galaxy needed a victory in Houston to clinch a home playoff game in the first round. There was a chance that they could even host two playoff games, depending on the outcome of the other matches. There was also a chance that forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic would claim the MLS Golden Boot award, which is given to the player who has the most goals at the end of the season. The race for the Golden Boot was going to be a photo finish as Ibrahimovic and Carlos Vela from rival LAFC were competing in the two-horse race. 

All the Galaxy fans knew the monumental impact of this match. We were fired up. As if that wasn’t enough, fans still clearly remembered last season’s Decision Day when the Dynamo traveled to Carson and ruined the Galaxy’s playoff hopes by coming back from a two-goal deficit to win 3-2, single-handedly eliminating them from the postseason. Fans were extremely disappointed with the team then and hoped to exact revenge this time around. 

Representing the boys in the corner section of the stadium.

Although our seats were tucked into the upper corner of the stadium, we were fully invested from the moment the starting whistle blew and for the two hours that followed, we stood in 95-degree weather with the sun glaring down at us as we chanted and sang with other Galaxy fans in attendance. We celebrated every goal passionately, with water flying from water bottles being waved around and fans high-fiving and hugging in celebration. 

Unfortunately, the Galaxy lost 4-2, which meant we wouldn’t host a playoff game and Ibrahimovic didn’t win the Golden Boot race as he fell four goals shy of Vela. As heartbroken as we were, we still sang and chanted even after the game was over. Dynamo fans were taunting us since they had spoiled our Decision Day festivities for a second straight season. We threw playful jabs back at them saying that we were still in the playoffs while they were going straight to their couches after the final match.

Cheering for your favorite team at home is always a fun experience, especially when you’re surrounded by thousands of fans who share the same love for the team as you. But I now have more respect for soccer fans who travel to watch their team perform in a hostile environment. It is never easy when you’re the underdog or outnumbered by the home fans, but it was definitely an experience I won’t forget and this was certainly not the last time I will be traveling to support my favorite team on the road in a rivalry game.  

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