October 17, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets his Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 7:30 pm Notes from the BULLpen: Behind Enemy Lines
  • 7:08 pm Golf 2019-20 Season in Full Swing
  • 6:58 pm Toros Volleyball Mourns Loss of Alum
  • 6:45 pm California Makes Big Stand Against NCAA
  • 6:11 pm The Lightning Rod: Rivers, Chargers Drop Third Straight Home Game
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Kelsey Reichmann
Editor-In-Chief

The Bulletin changed my life forever.

I know most communications students see this as just another class they have to pass in order to get their degrees, but to me, it is so much more.

Before The Bulletin, it was all theory and class projects. You wrote and only the professor would see your words. Your ideas were protected from public view.

And then you’re thrown into the deep end.

All of a sudden you are writing about real things. People you don’t know are reading your work. You’re asking questions you never thought you’d be able to ask or didn’t even know you wanted the answers to.

My final semester on The Bulletin staff, I was given the honor of being editor-in-chief and it was nothing like I expected.

I didn’t know how much pressure I would feel to produce important meaningful stories every two weeks. I didn’t know how difficult leading a group of people would be. I didn’t know how much criticism I would face for the stories I was writing. I didn’t know how it would feel to truly be passionate about something because what they don’t tell you is that when you find what you love it will probably cause you pain.

I also didn’t know how proud I would feel when each issue came out.

This semester was the hardest in my college career, but it was also the most rewarding. I am so proud of what this staff and myself have been able to accomplish.

This semester we focused on the real issues: faculty tenure, guns on campus, gender equity, free speech, religion, race.

As the cliche goes, nothing worth having ever comes easy, but that is how we learn.

I learned to be brave when I had the opportunity to interview academic affairs. I learned to be strong when I faced criticism from the president. But most importantly, I learned to believe in myself through every article I wrote and every issue we published.

Ultimately, I am extremely grateful that I grew as a journalist and as editor-in-chief of this publication,  and I hope it continues doing the work we started this semester so that one day I can look back and know that I was part of something revolutionary.

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