December 9, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:49 am CSUDH Celebrates First – Generation Students
  • 5:45 pm The Lightning Rod: 53-yard FG sinks Chargers
  • 8:16 am Gives Us Our Sunshine Back
  • 7:30 am University Theatre Re-Opens With Renovations
  • 4:20 pm Notes from the BULLpen: The Most Active Unit You’ll Ever Take
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Robin Renay Bolton, Co-Opinion Editor

At the 2017 Emmys, a red carpet reporter asked Issa Rae a very simple question, “Who are you rooting for tonight?” Rae, a multifaceted actress, producer, writer and all-around bad-ass responded, “I’m rooting for everybody black.”

To some, that comment might have been seen as divisive. Why root for someone based on the color of their skin and not the merit of their talent? But to Black people, it’s just what we do.

Whether you want to admit it or not, people of color are not afforded the same opportunities as white. Being born white automatically puts you in a position of privilege. So, when a Black person sees another Black person in a winning position, it’s natural for us to root for them.

Even when we don’t know that much about them.

When I heard Dr. Cornel West was giving a speech tomorrow (Friday, Sept. 27) at CSUDH, I didn’t have the same reaction as when I heard Angela Davis was coming to campus. Davis was different because I was familiar with her work. I’ve studied her story.

I don’t know much about Dr. West. I know he’s a distinguished Harvard professor who has written dozens of books. I know that he is very outspoken about race relations in America. I know he’s a Black man with a successful career, but that’s it.

I’ve never heard one of his speeches or read his books. I’m a little ashamed to admit the only piece of his work I’m familiar with is his role in the “Matrix” movies.

That alone is probably enough to revoke my Black card.

Even still, it wasn’t a big deal. I’m a millennial with a computer, all I have to do is Google him, right? So, Google I did. I read articles about different speeches he’s given at other colleges. I watched clips of these speeches. The more I watched, the more I realized he’s probably not my cup of tea.

While I agree with most of the things he stands for, his delivery is a little off-putting to me. He skirts a thin line between passionate and dramatic

But Dr. West’s bio on his website describes him as a “provocative democratic intellectual,” so I’m not too surprised by his demeanor. Still, I was almost resigned to not go to the event because I wasn’t sure I would enjoy it.

Then I came across an article about his appearance at Liberty University. Last month, Dr. West appeared alongside Dr. Robert George at Liberty University’s Convocation.

Like Dr. West, Dr. George is a distinguished professor at an Ivy League college. Unlike Dr. West, Dr. George is a prominent conservative intellectual. Naturally, they don’t see eye to eye on a lot of things, but they respect one another.

During the event, Dr. West said, “ I think he is wrong on a number of issues, he thinks I’m wrong on a number of issues, but we revel in each other’s humanity and we meet each other at the foot of the cross.”

So while I don’t necessarily agree with Dr. West’s delivery on a number of things, I still feel like I can respect him and the things he stands for. I can still channel my inner Issa Rae and root for anybody Black… for now. 2

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