October 15, 2019
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:18 am Examining Diseased Roots
  • 7:59 am Putting the Corrido in its Proper Perspective
  • 9:56 pm The Lightning Rod: Chargers Preview, Week Six
  • 6:13 pm No. 3 Golden Eagles Too Much to Handle for Toros
  • 7:34 pm No Love in This Elevator
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Akeem Ivory, Esther Cruz, Christian Mosqueda
     Carlos Alvarez and Lili Ramirez

The first debate of political heavy weights Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton took place  Sept. 26, and the new LSU TV Lounge was filled with students, who sighed, cheered and laughed as the candidates traded verbal blows.

     Most of the students appeared to favor Clinton, and her responses to topics that resonated with them did not go unnoticed.

     “Hillary is talking about issues of race and gender,” said Leobardo Mejia, a freshman. “She is touching on issues that Trump sees as a joke, and has strong points on [racial tension], I feel that she’s the better option for president.”

     Gina Gray, an English education major, appreciated Clinton being prepared with not only ideas, but a plan. She struggled to find a word to describe the Republican candidate, but is not a fan.

     “[Clinton] is recognizing that there is an issue,” said Gray. “[Trump] is just an embarrassment to the country. He doesn’t accept the truth. This is the best the Republican party has?”

     Despite many students being in Clinton’s corner, Trump was not without his supporters.

     Junior Michael Gray, a business major, said Trump provided the best responses and hit on key points. He favors the Republican nominee’s position on jobs.

     “We need the jobs here, but [Clinton] is talking about expanding and going out of the country,” Gray said. “We are losing jobs. It’s not about the tax cuts, it’s about the jobs staying here.”

     Jackie Pineda, logistics major and former supporter of conservative candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, who dropped out of presidential race in March, is now left with only Trump to choose from.

     “[I support] Trump, because that’s my party,” Pineda said.

     There were some students, who expressed doubt in both candidates and their ability to run the country.

     Joe Alvarez, a senior, longs for a time when the possibility of Sen. Bernie Sanders becoming president still existed.

     “[Clinton and Trump] both have history that seems corrupt, unjust and racist,” said Alvarez. “My choice of candidate was Sanders, not because I’m young and in college, but because I felt like he had the advantage of actually doing good.”

     Alvarez, like many others, said the presidential candidates avoided answering important questions. Watching the debate only confirmed his opinions on Clinton and Trump.

     “Oh, man. I just think it’s like a comedy skit,” said Alvarez. “I honestly feel like we are choosing people who cannot lead.”

     The presidential candidates weren’t the only ones on display during the debate, students also had opinions on the job done by moderator, Lester Holt.

     “Lester is doing a good job,” said Gray. “He’s keeping everyone on track when they’re challenging him.”

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