November 22, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 4:53 pm Hate Symbol Found at QCRC
  • 4:48 pm CFA Roundup: Presidents, Prisons, and Postponements
  • 4:44 pm Hate Immigration Concerns Rattle Nerves
  • 4:41 pm To Grow, Money Matters
  • 4:36 pm Native Roots
Story tips, concerns, questions?

Cynthia Elviro starts as Harriet Tubman in “Harriet.”

Welcome to the first installment of a new online column by Lavielle Hibbert, a Bulletin staffer attempting to juggle a full-time job, a full set of classes this semester, and some semblance of a personal life. Strapped for time as we all are, she’s decided to do her part by clueing readers in on events, organizations and other campus-related doings that she thinks are of great benefit.

By Lavielle Hibbert
Staff Reporter

According to its mission statement on the university’s website, The Rose Black Resource Center (RBRC) aims to “provide a safe and inclusive space that promotes the academic, cultural and social development of Black students in order to increase enrollment, engagement, retention, and graduation rates.”

The word inspire isn’t in there, but that seems to be what the RBRC is doing with a special event it’s holding Nov. 5: a private screening of the major feature film “Harriet,” at the Cinemark theater in Carson. The Harriet in question is Harriet Tubman, the legendary conductor on the Underground Railroad who escorted scores of people to freedom before the Civil War.

Harriet Tubman, 1822 (estimated)-1913

I haven’t seen the movie, which stars Cynthia Enviro and which was released nationwide Nov. 1, but if it is faithful in any way to Tubman’s story, I can’t imagine it disappointing. Tubman’s life was too remarkable to not make a fascinating biopic. (The film has a 97 percent audience rating on Rotten Tomatoes; though, like any big-screen epic, it has generated some controversy).

I also can’t imagine a more fitting figure from that era of American history to give students of color, and all students for that matter, inspiration to stay in school, graduate and then make their mark in the world like Tubman. Because Tubman certainly did, without a formal education or even freedom the first part of her life.

Born a slave, she escaped to freedom but courageously threw herself into the battle to gain freedom for others. Not through words, but action. She physically led scores of people the network of safe houses and secret routes and into the northern states—all while carrying a bounty on her head. But her story didn’t end there. She was also a nurse, a Union spy and a vocal supporter of women’s suffrage.

Just like Hollywood had to change to get a film like this made, it is only through actions of individuals, whether on their own path or in conjunction with others, that substantive change can be made on the many issues confronting America in 2019. Tubman’s story is a perfect reminder of how that change is possible.

According to RBRC, after attending the movie, students will be able to identify the role and contributions that Tubman made to the abolition movement, explain the purpose of the Underground Railroad and how the Underground Railroad operated and to compare and contrast the events depicted in the film to real-life events.

The film begins at 6:45 p.m. Nov. 5. All interested students must RSVP in person at the RBRC (LSU132). Make sure to take your student identification.

Students must arrive at the Cinemark Carson theater no later than 6:45 p.m. with their CSUDH student identification and off-campus guests are not permitted.

To contact the Rose Black Resource Center, stop in at their office, in LSU 132, email them at BRC@csudh.edu or call (310) 243-3668.

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