November 14, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:25 pm Toros Booted Out of Playoffs in Dramatic Fashion
  • 8:43 am Saving One Tooth at a Time
  • 12:41 pm Women’s Soccer Back in Conference Playoffs
  • 9:40 am Will Gina Rodriguez Ever Shut the Hell Up?
  • 10:11 am How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love (well, tolerate anyway) the Bus
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Yeymy Garcia
Features Editor

I never thought I’d feel unsafe at CSUDH.

Now, nothing really happened to me personally, but my girlfriends would constantly complain about a professor who would ask for their numbers, call them pet names, give massages, and visit their homes without consent.

Hearing this information from my friends created a cautious fear in me. I made sure to never see him alone after class or during office hours. If he complimented my appearance saying I looked good, I’d question whether it was inappropriate. I didn’t know, and even if I did, I didn’t know who to talk to.

According to rainn.org, only 230 out of every 1,000 sexual assaults are reported to police and 20% are female college students. Fear of retaliation, belief the police would not take action, and the belief that the incident was not important enough to report are some reasons why victims do not report the crime.

Elizabeth Schrock, CSUDH’s Title IX Officer, said it can be difficult to know when a professor has violated the policy against harassment.

“I think it’s hard to know where the line is,” Schrock said. “The student has every right to draw the line…But any behaviors that are against policy are unacceptable.”

Some behaviors against policy include sexual touching without consent and comments that make a hostile environment. Winking and compliments are not against policy but depending on the context and your boundaries, it is worthy to come talk to Schrock if you are uncomfortable and she will help and talk to you about your options to address the problem, she said. If you want your report to be 100% confidential, you can also talk to CSUDH’s Sexual Assault Victim’s Advocate, Mayra Romo.

It is important to know your rights as a student towards any harassment (sexually-related talk and bullying) and misconduct (touching). The CSU policy can be found in the most recent Executive Order 1097 which prohibits discrimination relating to protected statuses such as age, disability, gender identity and expression, race, religion, and sexual orientation. It also prohibits dating and domestic violence, stalking, and sexual activity without consent. Editor’s note: Read more about recent changes to this policy on our website csudhbulletin.com under “CSU Policy Changes.”

If you feel your rights have been violated, fill an online report or contact Schrock at eshrock@csudh.edu or pay her a visit in Welch Hall B-470H. You can also contact Sexual Assault Victim’s Advocate Mayra Romo at mromo@csudh.edu.

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