January 25, 2021
  • 10:02 am Straight Down the Chimney and Into Your (Digital) Hands: Special Holiday Edition of The Bulletin!
  • 2:44 pm Did You Wake up Looking this Beautiful?
  • 11:43 am A Long History for University’s Newest Major
  • 5:15 pm Issue 5 of Bulletin Live! Collector’s Item! Worth its Weight in Digital Paper!
  • 4:06 pm Special Election Issue
  • 4:03 pm Three best Latinx Halloween & Horror Short Films available now on HBO Max
  • 9:49 am Issue 3 of CSUDH Bulletin Live if You Want It
  • 3:24 pm Hispanic Heritage Month Update
  • 2:00 pm South Bay Economic Forecast Goes Virtual
  • 3:52 pm BREAKING NEWS: Classes for Spring to be Online, CSU Chancellor Announces
  • 9:39 am “Strikes” and Solidarity
  • 8:30 am March Into History: Just 5 in 1970, CSUDH Growth Shaped by Historic Event
  • 8:30 am Will the Bulletin Make Today Tomorrow?
  • 9:04 am Different Neighborhoods Warrant Rubber Bullets or Traffic Control For Protesters
  • 5:07 pm STAFF EDITORIAL: Even Socially Distant, We All Have to Work Together
  • 5:47 pm Transcript of CSUDH President Parham’s Coronavirus Announcement
  • 10:46 am Cal State Long Beach Suspends Face-to-Face Classes; CSUDH Discussing Contingency Plans
  • 5:26 pm Things Black People Should be Able to Get Away with This Month
  • 10:25 am Latinx Students Need a Place to Call Home
  • 2:35 pm Will Time Run Out Before Funds for PEGS? [UPDATED]
  • 5:18 pm Greatness Personified: Remembering Kobe Bryant
  • 8:41 am Year of the Rat? What’s That?
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:33 am The Most Family Bonding Time of The Year
  • 9:32 am How My Holidays Will Look Like From Now On
  • 9:31 am I’m Black but My Spotify Wrapped 2020 is All White
  • 9:51 am Old but Gold, The Glory of Toys
  • 9:51 am One Divorce and Double the Holidays
Story tips, concerns, questions?

You never know who you know around you can get COVID-19. SO please wear your masks. Photo by wuestenigel is licensed under CC BY 2.0


By Melany Ruiz, Staff Reporter

For the past two weeks, my house smelled like bleach. 

My nose would burn from the stench of it all over the house, my absolute nightmare became a reality. My grandma tested positive for COVID-19.

It’s been something I’ve dreaded since the start of the pandemic. Eight months ago I remember being on the phone with her, weeping, telling her to go back home and to leave the supermarket instantly. I was on my way to work when we were told to turn back and start reporting from home. I knew things were getting serious and my grandma, who is diabetic and has low blood pressure, I knew the virus was going to affect her more. 

Flash forward to now, an innocent cough turned into a fever, resulting in the infamous COVID-19. I am the only one who works from home, I had to notify my family to come home and figure out our new living situation. 

In a blink of an eye, all surfaces, furniture, sheets were cleaned. My grandpa who is at the highest risk from the virus was sent to live with my uncle, my mom moved into my grandpa’s room, and masks, face shields, and hand sanitizers were in every corner of our house. Everyone else got tested, including me two weeks after my grandma’s COVID test, everyone was negative. WE think my grandma might have contracted COVID-19 at a quick supermarket run.  

I felt this great remorse for my grandma as she coughed, sneezed, threw up, and suffered from high fevers. Due to her pre-existing conditions, she was sent to the hospital to ensure her vitals were strong enough. 

It’s times like these where you want to hug and keep close to the ones you love, but unfortunately, that was all taken from me. I wasn’t able to see her or check up on her for almost three weeks, the amount of work that my job and school demanded made it impossible for me to check in on my grandma, I was forced to stay strapped to my desk and work away

The place where I was supposed to feel the safest, was now infested with COVID-19. My home’s walls are crawling with the virus.  

Everyone had to be isolated in their own room, only leave if they needed food or to use the restroom, all while wearing a mask and sanitizing everything you use/touch with bleach. 

For 14 days it was just my cat, me, and my room. If being stuck at home sucks, now imagine being stuck in your room, not even being able to freely roam around your own house.

It sucked. 

This affected my productivity and mood. Even my cat wanted to run around the house besides my tiny room. My anxiety was blasting through the roof as I wanted to know how my grandma was doing. I wanted to make sure she could breathe, I wanted to make sure that the rest of my family weren’t infected, that I wasn’t infected. My anxiety filled up in my chest and into my mind, I couldn’t relax with the worry of my grandma’s health and the worry of my job and school workload. To top it off, the world’s longest election was happening during this time, I had to be anxious about who will be in charge of running the country for the next four years. My anxiety was booming. 

I always heard of people being affected by Covid-19  and knew how tragic it was based on what you hear on the news, but I got to see the reality of it through my grandma’s own battle with it.

 After hearing so many cases of people dying and not being able to breathe I caught myself yelling through the wall every few minutes, hoping my voice echoed to her room, asking her if she could breathe.

It’s been a month since she tested positive and I am thankful that she is alive and slowly recovering. It is really unfortunate that not every person had the same luck as my grandma, especially with having pre existing conditions.

 I can now confess that I truly didn’t take Covid-19 seriously until it hit my home. I didn’t understand the severity and the physical, mental, and emotional toll it takes on you and your family. It’s been a month and we are still being affected. We’re constantly getting tested and we are trying to keep up with purchasing masks, hand sanitizer, and disinfecting supplies all while the second wave of COVID-19 is on the rise.  

Let this serve as a reminder to please wear your mask, stay six feet apart, and stay home.

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