April 24, 2019
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
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  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
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  • 9:36 pm Breaking News: Naomi Goodwin to Retire in June
  • 9:06 pm Nipsey Hussle’s Death Forces Dom Kennedy to pull out of Thursday’s Spring Fling
  • 8:27 pm Associated Students Inc. Election Results

By Neekoo Delrooz for The Bulletin

The students of CSUDH are still reacting to the shock from the presidential election on Nov. 8, which resulted in a Donald Trump electoral win. On- campus organizations like the Women of Color and Peace Club held a peaceful protest on Nov. 10 in collaboration with the Society of Independent Student Journalists, Black Student Union, Equality Club, Chicano/a Studies, Women’s Resource Center and the Office of Student Life.
Waves of protest have spurred up throughout metropolitan cities like Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles, and the students at Dominguez Hills followed suit, using this protest as an opportunity to speak their minds and unload some long-carried baggage this election has packed.
In an effort to ease the minds of many worried students, Alma Lopez, president of the Women of Color Club, came together with her members the day after the election to draft up a plan to bring students together for an Empowerment Walk.
“We wanted everybody to come together to heal,” Lopez said. “A safe space to all speak our opinions, be heard and feel like other people agree with us. Nobody should feel alone right now.”
While Americans across the country turned to social media as an outlet to express their grief, organizations on campus decided to become proactive.
“We couldn’t just sit there and be hurt,” said Lopez. “This is a time to unite.”
The event brought students and faculty, some from marginalized groups and discriminated paths, together in solidarity. As CSUDH is one of the most diverse campuses in the Cal State system, there was a big turnout. About 300 students marched together to raise awareness and petition against the president-elect, Trump.
The divisiveness of Trump’s campaign has put many people at odds and left people in fear for their rights. The groups targeted by Trump’s words and policies are now in a greater position of vulnerability. A large group of those present were protesting the president-elect’s threats to deport undocumented immigrants.
Although these students are eligible to enroll for school in this state under the California Dream Act, they are still not considered citizens or “legal” under federal law. Undocumented students who attend public, community or private college are eligible for financial aid within the state. While one protest leader gave a speech to the crowd regarding immigration, some students were heard yelling out, “DACA, DACA.”
The DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which is a federal process that defers removal action of an individual for a specified number of years.
While no one knows what actions Trump may take in the coming future, the protesters still expressed their legitimate fears, and made it known that they would not take discrimination lying down.
Clubs and organizations on campus came together to generate unity and gave students a platform for their concerns to be heard. There were several signs at the march, some that read: “Get involved everyday, not just today,” “Still we rise,” and  “Unity in our community.”
This peaceful protest created a safe space for the students and faculty to come together and march through campus, as a message to everyone that the CSUDH community is still strong, no matter who the president may be.

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