September 22, 2019
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 7:00 am The Lightning Rod: Texans-Chargers Preview
  • 8:00 am Catching a Travel Bug at the Study Abroad Fair
  • 11:13 pm Major Challenge Faces Unbeaten Volleyball Team Tonight at Cal State LA
  • 8:00 pm Study Abroad Fair Connects Toros With the World
  • 5:55 pm Toros Fall Sports Previews
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Jacqueline Resendiz Morales
Staff Writers

The “Made in Cotton” exhibit, which opened Oct. 25, will continue through Dec. 7 at Cal State Dominguez Hills.
The exhibit focuses on racial politics, the production of cotton and the history of slavery.
The exhibition has pieces from artists Mark Steven Greenfield, Karen Hampton and Raksha Parekh.
Each artist excels in different types of imagery, from using cotton as textiles to ink drawings. The artists decided to use cotton as a look into African American struggle.
On the first day of the exhibit, Greenfield, the artist who is curating the show, talked with guests about his journey and what has inspired him to create art.
He described experiences throughout his life that have shaped the way in which he creates his art, such as traveling to Africa and having a religious, cultural and spiritual experience reflected in his paintings.
His work – and this exhibition – covers difficult subject matter regarding the African American experience. And not everyone has always been comfortable with his work.
“I was being criticized by a specific generation, and I had to respect the fact that some people could not accept it based on their experience,” he said. “For instance, my grandmother, who grew up in Tennessee, could not tolerate it because she was too close to it … (and) my mother said, ‘These things are taboo’.”
But younger generations understood the ground he was trying to cover and was more accepting of challenging subject matter.
“I felt it was a time to take a turn,” he said. “To take the power away from them, you can only take possession of it, and you can only take possession of it if you can change the context enough, so that people engaging in and so my children’s generation can look at it and say that’s an important part of history but that’s not me.”
The show is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday in LaCourte Hall-A107.

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