September 29, 2020
  • 3:52 pm BREAKING NEWS: Classes for Spring to be Online, CSU Chancellor Announces
  • 9:39 am “Strikes” and Solidarity
  • 8:30 am March Into History: Just 5 in 1970, CSUDH Growth Shaped by Historic Event
  • 8:30 am Will the Bulletin Make Today Tomorrow?
  • 9:04 am Different Neighborhoods Warrant Rubber Bullets or Traffic Control For Protesters
  • 5:07 pm STAFF EDITORIAL: Even Socially Distant, We All Have to Work Together
  • 5:47 pm Transcript of CSUDH President Parham’s Coronavirus Announcement
  • 10:46 am Cal State Long Beach Suspends Face-to-Face Classes; CSUDH Discussing Contingency Plans
  • 5:26 pm Things Black People Should be Able to Get Away with This Month
  • 10:25 am Latinx Students Need a Place to Call Home
  • 2:35 pm Will Time Run Out Before Funds for PEGS? [UPDATED]
  • 5:18 pm Greatness Personified: Remembering Kobe Bryant
  • 8:41 am Year of the Rat? What’s That?
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 8:00 am Get on the Horn: Rams Week 3 Preview vs Buffalo Bills
  • 8:00 am The Lightning Rod: Chargers-Panthers Preview
  • 8:00 am Disney’s “Mulan:” A Woeful Warrior Adaptation
  • 8:00 am Hey There COVID-19, You Still Out There?
  • 8:00 am Pros and Cons to Virtual Instruction
Story tips, concerns, questions?

It is all overwhelming, but busy students can find some peace. Illustration by Darlene Maes.


By Darlene Maes, Staff Reporter

The transition to taking courses via Zoom at California State University, Dominguez Hills has impacted not only students but faculty and staff as well. The experience of bad internet connection issues and being kicked out of zoom sessions are just a few inconveniences this semester has offered so far. 

Now that the first week of classes have ended, you may be thinking one of two things. “Yeah, there is no way I can get through a semester like this” or “I never want to go back to in-person classes.”

Despite your personal preference, one fact is certain: 2020 has been full of unwelcoming surprises. From the continuous rise of social injustices, the death of respected athletes, actors, and individuals in the public light and natural disasters. Additionally, the worldwide elephant that is still living in the room- the coronavirus pandemic. 

It is understandably an overwhelming time for anyone to manage through. However, some resources have made their services free and accessible despite the setbacks presented by the virus. 

You may have seen advertisements for an app called “Headspace” but may not be familiar with what it entails. After its launch in 2010, their purpose is to provide mindful habits of meditation to all audiences and illustrates the benefits of being sensible of your mind and body.

The application has introductory stages and long-term habits that each user can place into practice when convenient. With audio and visual instructions, it can be enjoyed by all levels of users learning healthy mental habits.

Jessica Orozco, 25, psychology major, at Fullerton College discussed her experience with the app. 

“I found it really helpful to calm my anxiety,” Orozco said. “I have acknowledged what raises my stress and anxiousness and wanted to try and manage it somehow. When I start feeling anxious and stressed with balancing my stuff, just laying on my bed and listening to the instructions gives me a sense of discipline to focus on myself. To be kind and listen to my body.”

The Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health has collaborated with “Headspace” to provide support during the health crisis. As a resident of Los Angeles County, you are eligible to sign up for the premium service of the application at no additional cost until December 31st of this year. 

Although we are depending on online use more than ever, the “Headspace” app can be utilized on mobile devices which can allow users to step away from their routine and take five minutes to themselves to decompress when needed rather than being stuck in one place watching a tutorial.

Even so, students who require support in different aspects of their life are not left to manage this uncertain time alone.

Did you know that CSUDH is still providing services to its student and faculty community? Health and Psychological Services and the Women’s Resource Center are available to all students despite limited access to being on campus.

Services include telehealth meetings (both over the phone and video conferencing) for counseling, support groups and psychiatric services. 

Additional resources are health education (contraception and sexual health) general care, and immunizations. If the services listed are not what you need assistance in, the university student services website can direct you to access the resources you need.

To maintain safety guidelines for all, each resource is asking students to either make an appointment over the phone, through email or schedule a zoom session. 

According to the Student Health & Services Instagram despite some services being unavailable such as x-rays, optometry, dentistry, and pharmacy they are still available for its other services and offering limited in-person appointments. Various organizations at CSUDH have adjusted to remain its present for the community by converting to virtual accessible content.


Although being on-campus is limited to those with approved reasons, the academic environment is missed by students. Virtual learning is still new and becoming acquainted with it will still take time. Having to continue being safe while trying to find balance in school and all other aspects of day to day living is becoming more difficult.

The journey to normalcy may be uncertain but the support CSUDH and other mental health services in the County are available to provide assistance and direct you to resources to alleviate the stress and uncertainty this year has presented.

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