November 14, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:25 pm Toros Booted Out of Playoffs in Dramatic Fashion
  • 8:43 am Saving One Tooth at a Time
  • 12:41 pm Women’s Soccer Back in Conference Playoffs
  • 9:40 am Will Gina Rodriguez Ever Shut the Hell Up?
  • 10:11 am How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love (well, tolerate anyway) the Bus
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Christian Mosqueda

Staff Writer

Joy was in full effect on Sept. 10 when members of OLE, Organizacion Latina Estudiantil, paid homage at the 16th annual Frida Kahlo Arts exhibit in Long Beach.

     Kahlo, a self-taught Mexican artist, lover of nature and women and men alike, transcends time with self-portraits and a surrealistic style of art that became popular in the 1920s.

     The event, hosted by Picture This, a small gallery in Long Beach, attracted a mammoth line at the opening that wrapped around the building.

     The exhibit showcased work by local artists, who paid tribute in their artwork to the late Kahlo. Festivities also included a Frida look-alike contest and live music by Casi Son.

     “The line extended outside from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m.,” said Juan Antonio Tavarez, a modern language professor at Cal State Dominguez Hills and OLE advisor. “It was 90 degrees outside, and people still went in, waiting 45 minutes.”

     Tavarez went on to say that even after death, people still care about Kahlo and the impact she had on the world.

     “She was living ahead of her time,” said Isaias Zagal, president of OLE. “(She had) a spirit of overcoming things. A spirit to survive.”

     Even through all the challenges that Kahlo faced — a bus accident, a failed surgical procedure that left her with lifelong pain and infidelity by her equally famous husband, artist Diego Rivera — she kept going till the end.

     “People can relate to that,” Zagal said.

     Jose Padilla, co-president of OLE who volunteered at the event, stressed his excitement for the way it turned out.

     “It was great to see how diverse the guests were,” Padilla said. “All of the paintings and all the look-alike contestants were amazing.”

     Padilla said the best part of the event was hearing the fans in attendance express their positive thoughts about the overall event.

     Kahlo continues to be a huge influence in Latin American cultures.

     “(She is) a symbol of resistance,” Tavarez said. “Regardless of the obstacles life throws at you, you can still represent your individual self and change the world.”

csudhbulletin

RELATED ARTICLES
LEAVE A COMMENT

%d bloggers like this: