December 9, 2019
  • 6:20 am Artist Who Gave Life to Death and Inspired Countless Others Gets His Due at Dominguez Hills
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:49 am CSUDH Celebrates First – Generation Students
  • 5:45 pm The Lightning Rod: 53-yard FG sinks Chargers
  • 8:16 am Gives Us Our Sunshine Back
  • 7:30 am University Theatre Re-Opens With Renovations
  • 4:20 pm Notes from the BULLpen: The Most Active Unit You’ll Ever Take
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Erik Flores

Staff Writer

It’s all or nothing for Chris Pressley, also known as C5, a recent digital media arts graduate from Cal State Dominguez Hills.

     Known for creating the album “Dorm Flow” on campus, C5 built his music career while attending CSUDH.

     Life after college is a new chapter for many alumni, but for C5 it means more opportunities to grow as an artist. He opened  for Desiigner in Cincinnati, Ohio, over the summer and now has his own record label.

     Originally from Oakland, but now residing in Carson, C5 is working for CBS Radio and Homegrown Radio while building up his music career at the same time. People can listen to his latest album, “Dorm Flow 2,’’ on Pandora, Spotify and Apple Music.

     C5 recently sat down with The Bulletin for a brief Q&A, where he revealed his upcoming plans as an artist and recent graduate.

Q: How’s life after college?

A: Life after college is dope. I get to focus on my craft and music. It’s still a struggle. I have a job that I’m working now to support me financially until the music pops. With school, it was hard trying to manage everything; school, work and music. I’m still utilizing the resources I got from college. I advise everybody to network in school. It’s all about who you know. I knew that, but I didn’t believe it until now.

Q: Any new upcoming music?

A: I’m working on a new project right now. It should drop in late October or early November. It’s not a “Dorm Flow 3.” This one is more up-tempo. It’s gonna be a whole new sound to break the door in and get more followers. “Dorm Flow” is not just an album, it’s also my label.

Q: How do you feel about “Dorm Flow” merchandise being sold at school? Despite almost being kicked out of school because of “Dorm Flow”?

A: It’s surreal, definitely an achievement. We’re gonna keep going and try to get “Dorm Flow” in all book stores. When I started “Dorm Flow,” everybody was rocking the shirts, but one of the music videos got to the vice president, and she and the other staff weren’t feeling it. I almost lost my job and was almost kicked out of school. I turned it around when I started getting involved on campus and being a mentor for the Male Success Alliance, they started seeing what I was doing in school — and with the kids. Then, I dropped “Dorm Flow 2,” and it was all positive. I feel like I represented the school well.

Q: How is your fan base at school now that you’ve graduated?

A: To be honest, there’s a lot of new people. Some of them new students. I guess the older students passed “Dorm Flow” down to them.

Q: How do you feel about your music being streamed on Pandora and Spotify?

A: It’s crazy! You have to go through a distributer to get it on Apple Music or Spotify. Once you get it on Apple Music, it’s basically on all platforms. It’s not hard; you just have to go to a good distributor. It’s all about who you know and network with. I know a homie that knows a distributor and hooked it up from there.

Q: What are your aspirations in life now that you’ve graduated and have a sense of direction?

A: I definitely want to become a prominent artist and open up a nonprofit for youth in oppressed areas, like a music program to keep them out of trouble. I want to do it all. I don’t want to limit myself to one lane. I want to get into acting and endorsements. I want to get involved in all of that, so I mean, it’s only up from here.

Q: What’s does “All or Nothing” mean to you?

A: It’s all or nothing. Basically you have to give it 100 percent on your dreams, relationships and jobs. I mean, if you aren’t gonna give 100 percent, then why do it at all? Especially in this career, you gotta go hard. Early mornings, late nights, because only one in a million makes it.

Q: How much has Dominguez Hills impacted you as an individual, now that you have graduated?

A: I have grown so much since I came in. I feel like I’m a people’s person now, before I was very reticent. Dominguez changed my life. The staff were very supportive, I even had teachers wearing the “Dorm Flow” shirts. I am gonna come back when I do something big, once I get up there, because I’m not gonna forget where I came from. I feel like Dominguez Hills played a big part in getting me and my music where I am now. I have love for Dominguez Hills.

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