October 15, 2019
  • 5:16 pm Why I’m Rooting for Dr. Cornel West
  • 5:00 pm Under Fire from the Feds, Vaping’s Future is Cloudy
  • 3:28 pm Enrollment, Part one: We’re Going to Need a Bigger Boat; Tsunami 3.0 Hits Campus, Enrollment Swells
  • 1:22 pm THE FIRST ISSUE OF THE BULLETIN IS HERE
  • 4:48 pm University Weathering a Wave of New Students
  • 9:21 pm The Bulletin’s Public Records Request Offers Springboard to Launch Gender Equity Discussion at CSUDH
  • 4:27 pm Black is the New Black: Raising the Capital on the “B” Word
  • 10:53 am Guns Up for Arrest: Student advocacy group pushes for CSU No Gun Zones–Including the Police
  • 4:09 pm Staff Editorial: Words on the First
  • 8:42 pm Carson Mayor Blasts Media, Landmark Libel Case in Keynote Address
  • 9:27 am Free Speech Week Calendar of Events Update
  • 6:02 am Food for Thought: 40% of Students are Food Insecure
  • 3:12 pm Academic Senate Rejects CSU GE Task Force & Report
  • 3:06 pm Work To Be Done
  • 5:56 pm ASI Elections: What You Need to Know
  • 8:02 pm CSUDH President Parham Announces Cancer Diagnosis
  • 9:47 am CSUDH Art Professor’s 20-Year Journey Results in First Local Showing of Film
  • 9:13 pm Free Speech or Free Hate area?
  • 9:08 pm CSUDH’s Best & Brightest Shine at Student Research Day
  • 9:05 pm Academic Senate Approves Gender Equity Task Force
  • 12:37 pm When Dr. Davis speaks, Toros Pay Close Attention
  • 3:38 pm Investing in the Future: Dr. Thomas A. Parham Reflects on the Past Eight Months and Contemplates​ the University’s Future
  • 3:24 pm Green Olive to Open By End of Feb; Starbucks Not Until Fall
  • 3:20 pm Gov. Newsom’s Proposed Budget Hailed for Extensive Funding Increases
  • 3:08 pm Out of the Classroom: Labor and Community Organizing Course Aims to Teach Students How to Organize for Social Justice
  • 2:54 pm The Other Route in Professional Sports
  • 9:02 am Hail to the New Chief, CSUDH President Thomas Parham
  • 3:36 pm Career Center Holds Major/Minor Fair
  • 5:34 pm After Unexpected Delay, Undocumented Becomes More Intimate Theatrical Production
  • 1:30 pm What to Expect When You’re Expecting New Buildings
  • 9:18 am Examining Diseased Roots
  • 7:59 am Putting the Corrido in its Proper Perspective
  • 9:56 pm The Lightning Rod: Chargers Preview, Week Six
  • 6:13 pm No. 3 Golden Eagles Too Much to Handle for Toros
  • 7:34 pm No Love in This Elevator
Story tips, concerns, questions?

By Liliana Ulloa
Lifestyle Editor

Amidst the rise of the #MeToo movement, women all over the country are determined to tear down the stigma and shame that come with discussing sexual abuse. However, with October being Domestic Violence Awareness Month, victims of domestic abuse are hopeful their stories can also impact social change and empower other victims.

To raise awareness on campus, The Women’s Resource Center created the “Clothesline Project” at the LSU north lawn displaying testimonies honoring survivors’ experiences of sexual assault and relationship violence.

“It’s a way of hanging out our ‘dirty laundry’ and making it so it’s not a shameful secret,” said WRC Director Megan Tagle Adams. “Especially in this particular moment with the Me Too movement, it’s very important for us to make sure that survivors feel supported and encouraged to come forward with their stories if they chose so, and that they know they’re gonna be supported and embraced by our community.”

Statistics from the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence show one in three women and one in four men in the United States have experienced some form of physical violence by an intimate partner and intimate partner violence accounts for 15% of all violent crime. Cal State Dominguez Hills also helps raise awareness of domestic violence by requiring students to participate in online training videos such as “Rethinking Relationships” which aim to provide critical information about consent, bystander intervention, sexual assault, stalking, and identifying domestic violence.

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Liliana Ulloa

Community health major Eric Chukuka gave his thoughts on the importance of going through online training revolving domestic abuse and showed support of the WRC clothesline project as a fantastic method to raise awareness on campus.

“It’s really important that people share their stories so that other people can also have the courage to speak up and express their own experiences,” said Chukuka. “People should spread the word about domestic violence… any wrongdoers should be reported to the appropriate authorities.”

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Liliana Ulloa

Shaida Murillo, a healthcare management major, felt the online training was vital as it informed students on what is and isn’t appropriate behavior and helps students know what to do if ever in a similar situation.

“People who have been victims are gonna have those memories come back, but I think in the end it does better than it does trigger,” said Murillo. “Not everyone is a victim, so I think it benefits more than it does harm.”

If you need help, call The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or online go to TheHotline.org.

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